Things aren't always what they appear to be. So it’s best not to take them for granted.  What could be more well-known than the Statue of Liberty?  Well, let’s see…

Choose which of the following ladies loves cheesecake and shops at B&H Photo. In other words, which of the following statues of Liberty is the “true” one, located in New York?

Replicas Statue of Liberty by age fotostock photographers

Answer: None of them.

These replicas are located in: Georgia, Tokyo, Paris, Chicago and Las Vegas.  If confusion can occur with a famous face like Lady Liberty, imagine how easily it can occur with less known places and things!

A complete image description, including location information, is absolutely essential for images of geography, nature, botany, zoology, research, industry, medicine, science, world locations or travel, etc. Even images of street scenes, common people, street furniture or equipment and so on, will often benefit of some information about where they have been taken. See more in our complete keywording guide.

You may think this kind of information is not relevant for images which don’t fall in the World Locations topic, but keep in mind that many potential clients will need to know this information. If your image doesn’t have it, they will probably buy another image that does have the information. If you’re lucky, they will take the time to ask us for the information, and we’ll ask you, and by the time the client gets your answer, if you’re really lucky, they’ll still want to buy the image.  To put it simply: Specific location information = a more complete caption/image description = better chance of sale!

There's another reason that accurate location information is important.  Imagine that a happy-go-lucky British photographer on a whirlwind tour of Spain makes a mistake and captions an image "Plaza de Sol in Madrid" when it really is "Plaza del Rey in Barcelona."  Later, an ad agency in Chicago licenses and uses the image for an printed travel piece on Barcelona.  When a savvy customer complains, the ad agency is not happy.  And "not happy" in the U.S. might mean "going to court."  If there is litigation, the buck will stop with the source of the inaccurate information, the photographer.  Caption errors can produce unhappy clients or worse, lawsuits, so it´s very important to maintain accurate and complete caption information.  Here´s how...

7 Ways to keep track of detailed location information:

  1. For $200 or less (depending on your camera type), invest in a photo gps unit that will allow you to “geotag” your photos.

  2. When out shooting, carry a small notebook and jot down notes about the places being photographed.

  3. Take a photo of any informative signs or maps to document the information.

  4. Try to carry a detailed map of cities/areas where you are shooting so that you can trace your route, and know the streets/neighbourhoods/etc where you shot each image.

  5. Use Google-earth for the same, to pinpoint addresses or road and building names.

  6. Search Wikipedia for additional information on places and buildings. Do not copy and paste entire entries! Choose only important, concise details.

  7. If you have photographed a place, caption your images as soon as possible, while your memory is still fresh.

What’s your secret?  If you have a tip for how to keep track of location info, we´d love to hear it.   


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From a keywording point of view this is not an image

If someone asks you what can you see in the image above, what would you answer? Is that a landscape, a single tree, farmlands, the horizon, blue, green, yellow…? What would you say?

Perhaps you have something more conceptual in mind - like nature, isolation, solitude or tranquillity. If that's the case, we are on the right track. However, how many photographers do you think would add obvious, but not needed words like photo, photograph, photography, image or shot to their keywords (unless, of course, your photo shows indeed a photo)? Let me give you the answer: many!!

From a keywording point of view not everything is “holidays”

Keywords like holidays, vacation, relaxation, tourist destination, tourism or leisure should be used with moderation. Not every photo we take on our holidays falls in the holidays category. We can take a pleasant walk across the field in the above image during a holiday trip, but that doesn’t make it's a holiday pic.

Images of an indigenous community in Africa or a garbage can on a street corner are not holiday pictures either, even if you were comfortably seated on a safari jeep, or in a tour-bus, or walking around with your backpack when you took the picture.

From a keywording point of view this image is not a calendar

Keywords like calendar, postcard, greeting card, etc. shouldn’t be used unless that’s exactly what the photos are showing. Surely this image would fit perfectly in a wall calendar; it could make for a nice postcard as well, but the image is neither a calendar nor a postcard. Therefore, why are many photographers adding keywords which have possible end-uses of their images in mind?

Deciding how the photo is going to be used is up to the customer, not to you; your responsibility is locating the tree precisely and giving the date it was taken, although now we extract the date from the Exif data automatically. When analyzing searches logs that the www.agefotostock.com site creates, we don´t see clients searching using keywords like calendar, greeting card, postcard, etc., but we do see many searches for trees, fields, nature, isolation, solitude, colors, dates and precise places on earth. Why waste time loading up your images with plenty of unnecessary words? They won´t sell more, I tell you!

From a keywording point of view this image is not abroad (not for Czechs, at least)

This photo was taken in Southern Bohemia, in the Czech Republic. There’s little doubt that this place is abroad for the most of us, but someone who lives in Prague could feel quite at home there.

And that’s the point: foreign, abroad, overseas, faraway… all those relative concepts are dependent on the observer’s location, because if you are in Texas, the Czech Republic may sound like the end of the world, however in this global community, just when we all are trying to be world citizens, it’s not a good idea to use distance keywords to separate places, because nowadays distances are relative. Therefore foreign, abroad, overseas, faraway, alien, foreigner, etc. should be avoided unless the photo actually depicts these concepts.

Well, in fact this image is not a lot of things

It doesn’t help us to find keywords which don’t belong to the photo in question, even if they were quite appropriate for other images you sent us along with this one. It may sound obvious, but we must be careful when we assign keywords to a batch of images using Lightroom, Capture One or any other similar program because you should make sure that all keywords are valid for all images before synchronizing metadata. Otherwise search results will be inaccurate, and worst of all really frustrating from the client’s perspective.

From a keywording point of view this image only needs common sense when describing it

When thinking of keywording, keep in mind that common sense is the basic rule and minimalism is the required approach. Using less keywords but the appropriate ones, is often better than maximalism, using every single word that you think will make your images appear. In other words: less is more and common sense is required. Are you using some common sense when keywording your images? I bet most of you’re not!


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Popular opinion says that the bigger your image files, the more chances you have to sell them, and eventually, the more cash you will get. But this is only in theory...

In practical terms, and contrary to what popular forums say,  the best you can do is to buy a camera that will give you a decompressed RAW file of 50 Megabytes or more. There are affordable cameras for pro and semipro shooters that will do this. However, if your finances are not yet there because 14 cents an image does not allow for lots of expending, and your existing camera only allows you to get 12.1 mega pixels that give you a meager decompressed 30.3 megabytes file, the question is: do I want to upsize the file to 50MB or more?

If you say yes, how are you going to process substantial shoots of several hundred images? In batch processing? Are you aware that your results are going to be for many images unpredictable and time consuming? Why would you want to expend time hidden in your digital dungeon when the rule of thumb in order to make some money today (and let’s not forget about the 14 cents an image) is to generate lots of images... Volume, volume, volume!!! is what will guarantee good positioning in most ranked search engines and more selling possibilities as a result - if the picture is a good one, of course.

But if all the above does not convince you, and you choose to strain your eyes in front of your computer screen, at least strain them doing your upsizing, technically defined as interpolation, correctly. You have two options for doing this:

  1. You can send the resulting file from your camera, any camera, and our technical team will interpolate the images if necessary, or

  2. You can interpolate your files yourself and send the results to us and wait to see what we say...

But what is interpolation? Here are the three basic concepts:

  1. Interpolation is increasing the size in pixels of digital images, therefore allowing a bigger reproduction of an image that was not originally produced to yield such reproduction size. Interpolation is also known as image resize or even image upsize.

  2. Image resize is not a mathematic miracle that happens when you need to increase the total number of pixels. You can obtain a bigger size image file at the expense of losing definition with this operation. A bigger file is obtained by carefully adding the best approximation in color and intensity based on the values of surrounding pixels, in areas where the damage caused to the image is going to be lower. Unfortunately the damage will occur.

  3. The most frequent types of interpolation algorithms are the nearest neighbor, bilinear and bicubic. The Bicubic is the standard algorithm in many image editing programs used by professional photographers as it produces sharper images and hence better overall quality.

There are many programs that allow you to interpolate your images but there are subtle differences among them; therefore, every photographer has to carefully evaluate which one is the best that suits her/his needs, as the result can vary depending on the interpolation algorithm and the type of subject. For example, resizing an image of an architectural masterpiece is different from resizing a view of the Amazon jungle.

So, should I interpolate my files? The decision is finally yours, of course, but if you do so it’s important that you:

  1. Know the technical characteristics of your files to know how far up you can go.

  2. Check the image at 100% of visualization to verify that the result is correct, and that it has not become pixelated or is displaying artifacts.

  3. Think that sometimes less is more, and good quality files are better than large defective files. If you interpolate do it well. Otherwise just stick to the nominal file size that your camera can give you.

Remember that it is always cheaper to buy a better camera than to chain yourself to your computer screen upsizing your images; please use your time intelligently and get out and shoot more images as volume is really what is needed when photographers are accepting 14 cents for their images...ok, ok, even for $3 dollars per image!

Here is an example of what a badly interpolated file looks like:

The image received was certainly not really crisp - an otherwise ordinary image that does not have
excuses not to be razor sharp...

...but an enlarged detail of that picture at 100% of visualization shows the problem.


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The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in anyway.

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