The focus of Christophe Boisvieux’s photography lies in the bond between man and spirituality.   As a veteran photographer and author of travel books, his images have been published in prestigious newspapers and magazines internationally, images which take us on a gentle mystical tour around the world, paying silent respect to the beliefs, the people, the culture and the environments they reveal. He has mastered “writing with light”, as he describes photography, going back and forth between the earthly and the spiritual, the human and the divine… You can see more of Christophe’s work at www.christopheboisvieux.com.

Q: Choose 3 words that describe you.

A: Willing, dedicated, enthusiastic.

Q: How did you learn to be a photographer?

A: Since my early childhood I was always fascinated by the ever changing metamorphosis of light. Photography is nothing else after all than "writing with light"! That is how I became a photographer, I think. I learned photography on my own by making mistakes and watching closely the work of renowned photographers I admired.

Q: Any special artistic influences?

A: Henri Cartier Bresson, Robert Doisneau, Roland & Sabrina Michaud, Steve Mac Curry, James Nachtwey

Q: What is your favorite time of day to make photos?

A: Early morning and evening

Q: What equipment do you carry when you’re packing light?

A: 1 Nikon D700, 1 Nikon D300, 1 zoom 28-70 mm, 1 zoom 70-200 mm, 1 20 mm

Q: What’s the image that you are still hoping to make?

A: A faithful portrait of my wife!

Q: Why did you choose age fotostock to represent your photography?

A: It just happenend to be among the best on the market!

Q: What is the best or worst photographic advice that you have ever received?

A: The best: To roam and turn around a subject until you have the feeling you have worked it out. The advice was given to me by my friend Roland Michaud.

Q: What is the greatest challenge for photographers today?

A: Making a living in deregulated world gone mad!

Q: If you weren’t a photographer, what would you be?

A: A musician for sure!


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Our next featured 10 x 10 age fotostock photographer manages to open doors to some of the most inaccessible places for his photo productions. Javier Larrea regularly shoots photos of both models and also “real people” within hospitals, laboratories, research & investigation centers, specialized clinics and important industry/manufacturing centers. Watch science, technology and more being discovered in his photos and read on to learn how he does it. You can see more of Larrea’s work at www.jlarrea.com or at his age fotostock Profile

Q: Choose 3 words that describe you.

A: Obsessive, persistent, hard-working.

Q: Was becoming a photographer an easy decision to make?

A: It was an easy decision, although it was slow to mature. I was afraid that the passion might die out and become just another job.

Q: What’s your favorite lens and why?

A: I've always liked having a lot of lenses and it’s one of the most important elements for creating variety in your work, especially for stock photography. The one I like the best is the Canon 85mm, F/1.2, ideal for portraits.

Q: How do you plan/prepare for a photo production?

A: I've always been obsessed with good organization. You must know the location well, observe its light, then study the images you would like to make and consider a good order and timing. And most importantly, get it all down on paper! But all of this without ideas is worthless, of course.

Q: What is the most interesting place you have photographed?

A: There are many interesting places, and I think the diversity of this work is what makes it really interesting. Some places amaze you with their magnificent light and others with their content. If I had to choose one place in particular, the white room* of a laboratory for research on stem cells made a strong impression on me.

* White room - a room that is virtually free of dust or bacteria; used in laboratory work and in assembly or repair of precision equipment.

Q: How do you get access to photograph inside places like laboratories, hospitals and industrial sites?

A: It is a combination of contacts, experience and of course, persistence. And keep in mind; it’s unlikely that anyone will open the doors of these places to you unless you are offering them something of value.

Q: Why did you choose age fotostock to represent your photography?

A: There are several reasons; first, because they listened to me, then they taught me, and finally they supported me and enabled me to achieve my dream of living from photography. Throughout these 22 years of collaboration, the people at age fotostock have demonstrated their ability and skill in this market. In hard times, they have been able to adapt to new scenarios, resize the business, maintain a standard of reliability and remain committed to the photographers.

I also would like to take a moment to address my fellow photographers and share my disagreement with the methods and prices of microstock. I think that all of us, when starting in this world of photography, needed some recognition for our work, even if only unpaid publications. But if we want to keep producing, paying off our computers and eating every day, I don’t think microstock is the right way.

Q: Do you promote yourself through social networks? (facebook, twitter, blog, etc)? Is it helpful?

A: A website is good for showing your work and for showing examples when applying for permits, access, etc. I think social networks are quite attractive for distributors, but I myself am interested in producing images, not promoting them.

Q: What is the best or worst photographic advice that you have ever received?

A: The best: "The important thing is the idea, not the hardware.”

Q: If you weren’t a photographer, what would you be?

A: I've always enjoyed the world of advertising, but I spent 40 years dreaming of becoming a professional photographer, and now that I've made it, I can not think of doing anything else.


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When you look at the imagery of our next featured age fotostock photographer, you might wonder whether Lluis Real inhabits the same world as you and me. His is a world of misty, desolate landscapes, strange and eerie human forms and continual artistic exploration.  Enjoy the 10 x 10 of this long-time age fotostock photographer, and see if you can answer the question, "What is real and what is Real?"

Q: Choose 3 words that describe you.

A: Will, perseverance, patience.

Q: How did you learn to be a photographer?

A: At a photography school.

Q: Any special artistic influences?

A: I nourish myself upon what I like the most.

Q: What’s your favourite lens and why?

A: All of them. Each one according to the idea to do.

Q: What is your favorite time of day to make photos?

A: Not really, photography is light and I look for the right kind for every occasion.

Q: What song or kind of music would go well with your photos?

A: Jazz.

Q: What’s the image that you are still hoping to make?

A: All and none.

Q: Why did you choose age fotostock to represent your photography?

A: I knew several photographers that were in AGE at the time.

Q: What is the best or worst photographic advice that you have ever received?

A: The best: never turn in a photo that you do not like.

Q: If you weren’t a photographer, what would you be?

A: A cook.


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Welcome to the wild, wonderful world of Juan Carlos Muñoz. The images of this long-time age fotostock photographer show passion for, but also extensive knowledge of the animals, plants and natural environments of our planet. It is a potent combination which results in photography that is an authentic treasure; a treasure because it allows us to observe and appreciate species and places that we might never see in person and which will only exist for future generations if we can learn to conserve them.

You can see more of Muñoz´s work here or on his website which the photographer advises is currently under renovation.

Q: What 3 words best describe you?

A: Naturalness, Simplicity, Passion.

Q: Why did you become a wildlife photographer?

A: Ever since I was a child I liked nature so much that in college I majored in Biology, specializing in the environment.

Q: What is the animal or plant that you most like to photograph?

A: My group of “favorites” is very large, yet I am passionate about owls, penguins and meadow pastures.

Q: What is your favorite lens? Why?

A: A staple in my travel kit is the 24-105 mm lens because of its great versatility. In wildlife photography, I can’t do without my 500 mm lens.

Q: Are you more technical or intuitive in your photography?

A: Intuition is an essential element in all my images.

Q: What’s the image that you are still hoping to make?

A: Flowing rivers of lava.

Q: How do you finance your photographic trips around the world?

A: With the publication of my images in newspapers, magazines, and other parts of the editorial and advertising sectors.

Q: Why did you choose age fotostock to represent your photography?

A: I decided to work with age fotostock because I found age to be the most focused and far reaching agency in the Spanish market. Also, my images fit in well with the wide range of photographic subjects which age represents.

Q: What equipment do you recommend?

A: Incredible photographs are not necessarily created with expensive equipment, but in sublime moments. Any of digital SLRs that abound on the market today can allow you to capture remarkable images.

Q: If you weren’t a photographer, what would you be?

A: I’d be a field biologist.


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Gavriel Jecan, age fotostock photographer, lives quite literally between two different worlds, Seattle in the U.S. and Khon Kaen, Thailand.  Maybe it is this double residency between the "East" and the "West" what enriches his photography and allows him to create such sensitive, at times spiritual images of the places he visits.  At a time when to travel to exotic places and burn up the camera's battery with nonstop shooting has become commonplace, these quiet, glowing images of animals, people and landscapes are a breath of fresh air. 

But don´t get the wrong idea from my focus on his sensitive and spiritual imagery, Jecan also shows himself to be firmly rooted and active in contemporary business culture, promoting himself actively through Facebook, Twitter, a blog and a website.  Click the links to see how Jecan does it.  Look and learn.

Q: Choose 3 words that describe you.

A: Visual, Observant & Spontaneous.

Q: Why did you choose to be a photographer?

A: I was influenced by my father, he was an artist and he bought my first camera when I was 12 year old.  From then on, I felt the need to document and tell the stories of our weekend hikes with my family and friends and later on my climbing adventures and escapes in the wilderness.

Q: Do you have any special artistic influences?

A: I was influenced by many photographers and modern painters.

Painters that I admire who inspired me in my work : Robert Bateman (wildlife composition) Claude Monet , Georges Seurat, Vincent Van Gogh, Sally Anderson, Jackson Pollock, Romare Bearden, Mark Tobey. 

Photographers that I’ve learned from and whose work I admire: Art Wolfe (landscapes and Indigenous culture), Franz Lanting (wildlife), Galen Rowell ( Outdoors, Adventure),  Nevada Wire (Travel Photography), Jay Maisel ( Rural Photography), etc.

Q: What equipment do you carry when you’re packing light?

A: Usually I travel with two camera bodies and with these lenses: 16 to 35 mm, 50 mm, and 70 to 200 mm, plus an extension tube and strobe.

Q: Where is your favorite place to photograph?  And where are you still hoping to go?

A: Every place I am at that moment is my favorite, because every place provides a variety of subjects to photograph.  I would like to see and document West Africa and Greenland, before it melts away due to global warming.

Q: Do you plan your trips beforehand or do you make it up along the way?

A: I plan my trips few months in advance. If something unexpected happen when there, I change my planes.

Q: How do you promote yourself through social networks? (facebook, twitter, blog, etc)? Is it helpful?

A: I do use Facebook to share info about my work and latest trips with my followers and the Blog/website to promote my work. Yes, it is helpful.

Q: Why did you choose age fotostock to represent your photography?

A: I chose Age fotostock due to their efficiency in running the business, fast editing and their communication with photographers.

Q: What is the best or worst photographic advice that you have ever received?

A: Best advice was when my photographer friend Art Wolfe told me, “Wherever you are, don’t stop looking.”  And worst… too many to mention.

Q: If you weren’t a photographer, what would you be?

A: Probably an adventurer or something that could accommodate my family in it.
 
 


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The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in anyway.

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