Man portrait on his head dumb stupid

From the unstructured world of licensing visual content, generally called stock photography, due to the continued prevalence of photography stills, we are entering into another era of confusing descriptions of the products we license. Video, motion and footage are adding their doses of conceptual confusion.

In the history of stock photography, there have always been surreal definitions for the different types of licenses whose origins were simply “reproduction rights licensing.” Let’s review; we use Rights Managed, Royalty Free, Low Budget Royalty Free, Low Cost images, and even the most surreal of all “microstock”. Our industry has never been fortunate enough to clearly define what it actually licenses.

Imagine that we test the validity of the nomenclature for licensing types by asking the next door neighbor, maybe a used boats salesman, to give an example of someone who is quite removed from our industry. When he asks us what we do for a living, undoubtedly, we will need to enter into lengthy explanations describing that an image could be used for certain time, geographical area, etc. and others can be licensed and used as many times the buyer wants and even all possible intermediates. The funniest of all will be describing “microstock” because our boat seller will probably imagine that it refers to a smallish stock of something, completely opposite to the reality, in which microstock photography actually manages truly huge stocks of images.

For ages, something called “footage” has existed, which was defined as the raw, unedited material as it had been originally filmed. In those days of 35mm filming, a piece of film (with no sound) had 16 frames of 4 perforations in a foot of film (35 mm film had perforations on both sides of the frame) which formed 1 second of film. Footage was an obvious way of describing moving image material. Now in our stock photography world, some companies use the word “motion” to describe the licensing of moving images. To be precise in that case, the term to use should be “motion pictures” if we want to make sense, because the word “motion” is ambiguous enough to describe concepts of a legal nature, from football and even a song by Matthew West.

Nowadays, we license video which refers to the technology to electronically capture, process, store and transmit scenes in motion. Video, “I see” from the Latin verb “videre” refers to various formats for the storage of moving pictures that goes from analogue videotapes like Betacam and VHS to more modern digital video formats like QuickTime, MPEG-4, DVD, Blue-ray. However, most video we sell on the Internet today is in fact “video clips” which are short videos, no longer than a few minutes, if not only seconds each.

Furthermore, even YouTube is a video-sharing website on which users can upload, share and view videos. If you have footage or motion pictures the point is that they will probably be digitized into video, so why not unify the names? I think it’s better to say “car” than “a wheeled motor vehicle used for transporting passengers”.


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Don´t say cheese!   Please say and do something different!  For all of you photographers and clients out there who are getting tired of seeing yet another photo of a sacharine-sweet-smiling stock model, take a look at this gallery.

age fotostock Portraits

 

Stock portraits do not have to be predictable and generic.  In your next session with a friend or a model, why don´t you explore some new expresssions?  Ask your model to express different emotions, to go beyond just a smile or a silly face.  Some of the initial images might be too posed or "forced" to work, but as your model relaxes, and you communicate with him or her, the true expresssions will emerge.  Encourage natural acting and avoid overly theatrical poses and faces.  Keep it real! An expressive portrait can be very effective at communicating a concept, or catching the viewer´s eye.  

Stock models do not have to be all "pretty" people.  One of the most frequent requests of our clients is for "real people."  Real people might be less than perfect, they might be slightly overweight, they might not be young.  Especially look for models with interesting, expressive faces like the people in this gallery.  Avoid overly made up models, unless the make-up is integral to the shot (a goth teen, for example).  

Let your motto be "Extraordinary images of ordinary people."    Do not mistake our call for real, less than "perfect" models to mean that sloppy, less than perfect images of those models will be successful.  Look for the best lighting for every situation.  Be sure to create images with ample copy space (neutral space where the designers can add text and other design elements).  This is especially important in your vertical shots.  Consider how the photographers of the images in the "Portraits" gallery left copy space on the top, bottom or sides of the images.

Still in need of inspiration?  Don´t just copy the micro and/or stock photographer of the moment who boasts in the forums of big earnings (if any of them still do).  Look at portrait photographers outside the stock photo industry or go back to the classics, such as these masters of portraits: Julia Margaret Cameron, Yousuf Karsh, Arnold Newman and Irving Penn.  Their images might be old, but they have lost none of the visual impact and expressive force that first enthralled viewers.  And learn an important lesson from those pioneering photographers; Don´t be afraid to experiment!


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As we all start thinking about the new year, and the opportunities and challenges 2011 will bring, I’ve asked age fotostock founder and CEO, Alfonso Gutierrez, to share some of his reflections on the current situation and future direction of the stock photography industry and where he sees age fotostock in the mix.

Q: What is your background in the stock photography industry?

A: I started as a chemist specialized in photographic chemistry, but ironically, I worked in the pharmaceutical industry. Then I became a technical sales person selling Linhof and Hasselblad cameras, among others, and then a professional photographer until I started age fotostock 38 years ago.   

Q: Do you think your long experience in the industry is a strength or a weakness?

A: It is certainly a strength because in all these years I learned that if you want to stay in business, in any business, you have to carefully watch your organic growth and be able to restructure and adapt fast when the market situation requires a change. We have done that for all those years and we are still in business and progressing. Most of the great stock agencies of the past have vanished because they wanted to grow beyond their organic possibilities. Of course, the stock photography industry, being what it is, remembers those disappearances or failures, as victories. The cruel reality is that those agencies were finally sold and bought by companies that wanted to prove to the world how to do things better, and they started in the same cycle.  Now, the biggest stock agencies are suffering for the exact same reasons of the past.   Once you violate the equilibrium of organic growth, you are forced into a situation of financial difficulty that obliges you to reduce commissions for photographers or providers of images and/or pay them with noticeable delays.

Alfonso Gutierrez, Founder and CEO of age fotostock, shares his thoughts on 2011

Q: What is your opinion on the evolution of the business model in recent years?

A: I’m positive about the drastic evolution that the stock photography business model is suffering, although I fear that the changes are going to be analysed incorrectly. Many are thinking that the culprit of what is happening now is low pricing. In fact, the truth is to be found elsewhere in the transition of a static Internet web (Web 1.0) from the past to a much more modern model, opened to the users, the Web 2.0. Nowadays, microstock sites are more aligned with Web 2.0 than traditional stock agencies and it remains to be seen whether what some traditional stock agencies are trying will be a success or a failure. 

Q: How has this evolution affected traditional stock agencies?

Alfonso Gutierrez, Founder and CEO of age fotostock, shares his thoughts on 2011

A: Traditional stock photography has been caught in the middle of a combination of an economic recession where clients needing photos wanted something good and cheap that microstock/subscription could supply, and the need to change the old hierarchical style of pricing and selling typical of most RF companies to a much more agile, consumer-oriented service. Most stock companies still don’t see the need to implement any changes in how to approach the market, creating a lot of confusion in the traditional stock photography industry that will take time to resolve. As we look around, it is interesting to realize how some stock photography players resolve the evolution by establishing small offices in different countries of the world, while others create multiple web sites for image distribution in different countries, for a reduced commission to the local person that answers the phone. It will take some time to see the results of these different emerging traditional stock photography solutions.   

Q: Many people (photographers, agents, etc.) who have been in the stock photography industry for a long time would like to wave a wand and make microstock/cheap subscriptions disappear.  Would you?

A: Personally, I don’t see the point in wishing that microstock/subscription or any such model would disappear; it is as silly as wishing that Google would disappear. They are here to stay and they are as imperfect as everything and everyone in life, so understanding and using their imperfections can make your model cope better with market circumstances. There is still plenty of space to improve in dealings with photographers and clients.  With photographers, because of simple algorithms that show the images in greater demand, the more productive photographers rise above the creative talent that is less in demand, since they don’t have an industrialized production chain. And while selling manufactured commodities is one thing, selling images has intrinsic subtleties. Images are not produced in a mechanized production chain in spite of the availability of easy digital cameras, they are produced by photographers of diverse qualifications and in some cases the final product lacks the required final lustre. For example, solid captioning and great keywording is hard to find in many places because photographers must not only create the images, but also manage captions, keywords, MR/PR contracts and, on top of that, be some what responsible for any mistakes. In my opinion, all that work is excessive if you are going to be paid a share of 10 cents (multiplied however many times) because when the same cake will be distributed among many photographers, each one will realize that less times multiplied by 10 cents does not cover the costs. But I have learned that photographers will accept what popular wisdom signals, even if it is in the wrong direction.

Q: In your opinion are current prices for stock photography/microstock compatible with a viable business model?

A: For a traditional stock agency, very low microstock/subscription prices alone will not make the business viable. However, a low priced product is a nice addition; just an example, now nearly 40% of our entire Royalty Free sales are coming from easyFotostock, our Low Budget Royalty Free (LBRF) offer which sells images at the very affordable price of 10/20/40/60/80 Euros (small differences when quoted in US$) depending of file size. easyFotostock offers this without the hassle of an “extended license” that clearly foments license infringements. So, easyFotostock/LBRF is a model that brings us clients from microstock/subscription licensing who don’t want to pay cash in advance to get the images they need. However, microstock prices seem to be a viable model for some of the microstock/subscription players, especially for those with low overheads and only a virtual presence. On the other hand, rumours about at least one of the best known players reducing photographers’ margins invites speculation on how viable the very low prices really are.

Alfonso Gutierrez, Founder and CEO of age fotostock, shares his thoughts on 2011

Q: At age fotostock, we have found that top microstock shooters are increasingly interested in distribution through our more traditional channels. Do you think this is a trend reflecting a discontent with the microstock channels or simple expansion into new opportunities?

A: In physical chemistry, saturation is the point at which a solution of a substance can not dissolve any more of that substance and additional amounts of it will appear as a precipitate. A similar thing happens with images databases, there is a saturation point where more images do not imply more business for every photographer. Simple algorithms based on visibility, sales, quantity of images and a few more predictive parameters benefit some shooters that appear regularly and create problems for others that are hardly seen.  The system saturates with images and contributors have to find other solutions and distribution points that don’t use the exact same algorithms, or sell at a different price scale with less volume sales, but more money per image sold. So, the answer is yes, we see a growing interest in our Low Budget Royalty Free offer from a number of photographers looking for extra income in view of certain revenue stagnation in other models.

Q: What do photographers from traditional stock agencies have to learn from the microstock photographers?  And vice versa?

A: Generally speaking, I wouldn’t advise photographers to sweat their shirt to sell images at very low prices, no matter how much money you can make today by selling a huge volume, but my thinking as a photographer alone won’t discourage others from selling and sweating cheap. There is no secret about microstock as a licensing model. It is hard not to be successful selling original Rolex watches at a few cents a piece, if you understand my analogy. Microstock presence is welcomed because they are slowly moving stock photography agencies and traditional RF producers to change their mentality and modernize their thinking, if they want to survive in a world where the client is the king.

Q: Where do you see age fotostock and other traditional agencies in the near future?

A: Many things can happen that may affect the future of photography and hence those around it. There is a lot of noise and offers in the market and new and pre-existing products like video and 3D promise to be a revolution. However, the reality is that in 2010 we received more traditional images than ever before, in fact 1.152,639 images just from photographers. This shows a 24.06% growth compared to 2009 and represents a historical record in photographers’ submissions in the 38 years of age fotostock history. But what is more shocking is that on top of that, we received another 2.075.457 images for distribution from other stock agencies like us.  When your content grows by more then 3 million images in a year, one questions whether stock photography as we know it (traditional or micro) is reaching that saturation point and whether the precipitate forming is an indication that prices can’t go deeper; well, images can still be given to clients for free… Consequently, traditional agencies will need to radically modify their structures and their presence in Internet if they want to see substantial growth by the end of the year. In the long run, however, I see the same cyclical wave that I have seen for so many years, “...everything changes to stay the same in the end...”    

Q: What message would you share with age fotostock photographers for 2011?

A: I would share with them optimism. Photographers in general need to realize that good quality images always have a market, whether sold at minuscule prices or at better ones. The critical issue though is how to generate imaginative ideas that can produce great photographs which won’t be copied instantaneously. And the secret is “production quality.” Many of the images we see around could be dramatically improved if the photographer knew about the proper photographic language and would use better equipment, materials and ideas.  There is too much mediocrity around that shows little photographic competence and little imagination in resolving a subject. Many of the photographers that shoot descriptive travel imagery need to experiment more, one example from may others, experiment with longer lenses, in order to see an explosive change in the visual value of their images. Photographers shooting model released material and aspiring to become microstock winners, need to get out of the chromatic studio cliché that abounds so much nowadays because it is now beginning to show the limits. In other words, photographers need to re-invent visual relevance without looking around to see what the others are shooting, no matter how successful the other photographers are. Photographers must explore the depths of their own imagination to be successful.

 


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The images in this gallery are quite different from the documentary images by Ton Koene in our previous post.  However, images of healthy and happy lifestyles are important because they are part of the bread and butter of a stock agency.  We hope that more of you will be inspired to send clean, communicative images that provide designers and viewers with plenty of copy space and transmit messages that are easily understood, like mother & baby love or feeling at peace in the outdoors, etc.  Notice how easily these images can be achieved by using an adequate lighting (usually soft and luminous) and finding a natural, uncluttered setting. 

These images are from easyFotostock, our low budget RF collection, but we need good lifestyle images for the age fotostock RM collection too.  So what are you waiting for?!


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The number of images received from photographers the first working week of 2011 has decreased by 6.16% compared with the same week in 2010; however, the number of photographers sending images has increased by 61.61%. In other words, we see more photographers sending smaller selections of images, more frequently. Is something changing?

Our acceptance rate has also increased, growing from 36.05% to 47.17% during the same time period. Clients want to see new content everyday and among some photographers, quality is increasing. If the acceptance rate for any submission sent to us is over 47.17%, you are actually doing very well. Congratulations!!

However, one wonders, how can photographers possibly think that selections of dull and uninteresting images like these below have good sale possibilities? The old rule in stock photography has always been “Color, color, color, and more color.” Are certain photographers suffering from color blindness?

There is another kind of color blindness that we observe among other photographers. Time and time again, they send us underexposed images like the ones below.  Are they working with the correct screen gamma?

Understand that if your images don’t have well-photographed and interesting subjects with strong color and saturation, they won’t sell. A surprisingly high number of photographers don’t take the time to finish and polish their work.

I think it’s time to wake up, Friends, because I must say: many of the photographers sending images for age fotostock, and surprisingly, for easyFotostock, understand color very well. Their images are highly saturated and colorful, probably something that some of them have learned in the highly competitive microstock market. 

Coffee mill with coffee beans Healthy woman smiling Composition with raw vegetables and wicker basket Posing with a brush young woman
Figs Happy woman in sunny hotel A golden spire, at the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, Bangkok Thailand Fresh Sage Salvia growing

Well, Photographers, not all is lost, at least many shooters have learned to create bright and highly colorful images. Why not all of you? 


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The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in anyway.

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