All of you should read the following post in the CEPIC Blog which debates the recent Dreamstime Microstock offer of over a million images for free use, based on the pedestrian thinking that people that get images for free will eventually pay for them sometime in the future...

CLICK to read the article in the Cepic Blog 

Our photographers' chatroom has been humming with backlash. Here's just a few of the photographers' reactions:

"I'm not allowed to talk about the "old" days but back then the bosses of the agencies cared passionately about the business and often were artists as well, now it's all about money for them and lack of it for us.It won't be too long before photographers have to pay to sell their photos that are being given away free."

"I'm rapidly coming to the conclusion that shooting stock in this type of environment is rather pointless and perhaps not worth the effort for the 99%. Luckily I have other more marketable skills."

"I might be the eternal optimist, but I think there is still a decent paying place for high quality niche images. One that a micro shooter could not produce and one any jackass can't take with their iPhone. I try and produce them all the time."

"There is certainly no NEED for FREE content in today's ADVERTISING market. If you want to advertise, PAY the creator of the content you'd like to use! When one person (or business) WANTS to use free content - that doesn't mean another person has to deliver it at his own expenses."

It is clear that digital technology and the Internet has opened the door for new business models that favor the distribution process that balances the lowering of selling prices with the generation of volume. While this may initially sound logical, the ugly side is that photographers in general and the stock photography industry in particular will fall into decline because photographers cannot generate enough revenue to continue producing great images.

Cheap prices have devaluated photography to unimaginable levels in just a few years and have demoralized professional photographers. I believe that the only way to maintain the value of photography is to produce high quality content that attract clients attention because it is unique, innovative, creative and experimental and which maintains a more than decent price. age fotostock maintains the same principles, shooting the best images we can and trying to sell them for the best possible price.

We have entered into a vicious circle that we can only break out of if photographers and stock agencies demolish the fence that separates them and openly discuss certain pricing logic - otherwise the future will be uncertain for both of us.


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That´s right, age fotostock photographers and videographers can now submit both images and video clips.

We have updated the Road Atlas with a new video info section and also instructions on how to prepare and send video.  In the new video section, you will find a lot of basic information for photographers that are just starting out in video, such as basic video terms and also tips for shooting video with a DLSR camera.  In the link on how to prepare and send video, you will find guidelines on how your material should be prepared and sent to age fotostock.  We look forward to hearing from you with your questions and concerns, and mostly, to receiving your video material!

If you missed the official communication, you can see it here:


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The number of images received from photographers the first working week of 2011 has decreased by 6.16% compared with the same week in 2010; however, the number of photographers sending images has increased by 61.61%. In other words, we see more photographers sending smaller selections of images, more frequently. Is something changing?

Our acceptance rate has also increased, growing from 36.05% to 47.17% during the same time period. Clients want to see new content everyday and among some photographers, quality is increasing. If the acceptance rate for any submission sent to us is over 47.17%, you are actually doing very well. Congratulations!!

However, one wonders, how can photographers possibly think that selections of dull and uninteresting images like these below have good sale possibilities? The old rule in stock photography has always been “Color, color, color, and more color.” Are certain photographers suffering from color blindness?

There is another kind of color blindness that we observe among other photographers. Time and time again, they send us underexposed images like the ones below.  Are they working with the correct screen gamma?

Understand that if your images don’t have well-photographed and interesting subjects with strong color and saturation, they won’t sell. A surprisingly high number of photographers don’t take the time to finish and polish their work.

I think it’s time to wake up, Friends, because I must say: many of the photographers sending images for age fotostock, and surprisingly, for easyFotostock, understand color very well. Their images are highly saturated and colorful, probably something that some of them have learned in the highly competitive microstock market. 

Coffee mill with coffee beans Healthy woman smiling Composition with raw vegetables and wicker basket Posing with a brush young woman
Figs Happy woman in sunny hotel A golden spire, at the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, Bangkok Thailand Fresh Sage Salvia growing

Well, Photographers, not all is lost, at least many shooters have learned to create bright and highly colorful images. Why not all of you? 


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Have you ever taken a photo that you were absolutely positive would sell like hot cakes… and it didn’t sell…at all?  But then a random image you took of the back of an old box, broken glasses or some odd thing, has sold.  And keeps selling.  And you’ve wondered: What are those clients looking for?!


Well, we don’t promise a miracle, get-rich-quick, wish-list of ideas… but we would like to share some ideas, based on the requests of real age fotostock clients. 

If you are interested in receiving these photo ideas, follow age fotostock on twitter where you’ll find this first Production Tip: images in demand... a large pile of clothes on a white background (still).  We will be sharing these tips through Twitter only, not the blog, so click on through today.

Now the fine print.  It’s not just the idea or subject; it’s your creative interpretation and competent execution of that idea which will produce a good sellable image. Are you up for the challenge?


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Do you remember how we asked for Christmas images a few weeks ago in our Stock Photographer´s Calendar?  Here’s what we do with seasonal images:  we create a special gallery for clients to tempt them with the perfect images at the right time.

All of the images in this Top 10 come from easyFotostock, our Low Budget RF collection, which has grown exponentially this year with quality content from long-time age fotostock/Pixtal contributors, new photographers from the microstock world, such as Yuri Arcurs, and partner image agencies too.


easy TOP 10 Holiday Moments

Photographers that are interested in easyFotostock should consider how to produce good images on a low budget.  As you can see, most of these Christmas images involve minimal sets and props, which is one way to keep the costs low.  If you are interested in sending images for easyFotostock, download the easyFotostock contract  here (bottom of the page).

Otherwise, enjoy our holiday moments and start thinking about your wish list for Santa… a new camera with full HD Video ability maybe?


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The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in anyway.

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